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Plan for Parents

Another stop along the path to a growth mindset school culture is to develop a plan for sharing information about the malleability of the mind with parents. It is important to get parents educated so that the children can hear a consistent message at home and school.

Parents often struggle with the nature/nurture debate and can contribute a child's success or lack of success to genetics. Adult role models should never blame genetics for perceived capabilities or low expectations.

Building Resilience

Children will eventually try to avoid anything where they are not sure that they will be successful rather then view the situation as challenge to arise to.  Here are some suggestions for building resilience in children

  •  Use growth mindset praise
  •  Model flexibility
  • Adopt a " glass half full" mentality in the home
  • Help children find their niche

How can Parents Communicate to a Growth Mindset Message To Teachers?

  1.  Always start with the positive- Tell the teacher something that your child loves about the class.
  2. Share what brings out the best at home-Include a relationship between resilience, motivation, effort, or other aspects you want addressed. Show how this changes the child's performance.
  3. Share what does not work-
  4. Establish the partnership- Make the teacher part of the plan of action that incorporates your beliefs, as well as his oh her practices.

Chapter 6 illustrates the importance of all three groups-students, teachers, and parents-to work together when building a growth mindset culture.  The most important of these is the adopting and of and maintaining of a growth mindset in children.

As you look to plan for next year, what are some ways than you can provide information to parents about having a growth mindset at home?  How can you  continue to build your mindset skills as a teacher in the classroom?

Chapter 7, will discuss if gifted education and a growth mindset belief can coexist?

 

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5New teachers are generally stressed about JPAS. Here are some ideas that will help.

First Five Minutes of a Lesson

  • State behavior objectives – I need …. (JPAS Indicator 12)
  • State objective or I can statement – have students chorally read it (Indicator 25)
  • Tell students why it is important to learn this!!!!! HOOK (Indicator 17)
  • Make connections to what they are learning Give examples! (Indicator 17)
  • Teach Lesson Continue to monitor students to keep them on task
  • Re state objective (Indicator 25)
  • Self-assessment on understanding (indicators 53, 54, 40, 48)
  • thumbs up/down, 1-2-3 under the chin, ‘Fist of Five’
  • Self-assessment on the student’s personal behavior
  • thumbs up/down, 1-2-3 under, the chin, ‘Fist of Five’ (indicators 53, 43)

Just a Heads UP!  The JPAS class is an awesome class and well worth your time!  Also check out the JPAS website at http://jes.jordandistrict.org/

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Isn't summer wonderful?  Sleeping in, re-acquainting with long lost family members, sipping iced beverages pool side, and attending professional development. Does one of these things not look like the others? Although the professional development may not be what some teachers might consider a highlight of summer, those who know actually look forward to the opportunity to learn ways to improve professionally. Remember, and an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

The summer is where many of the solutions to problems of the previous school year are found and many of the potential problems of the next school year are prevented. There are many places to look for opportunities. A good place to start is at the USOE website. Summers off? Sort of.

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At this time of year, when so many of our students are in the thick of test taking, it seems natural to think about our own year's growth. How high have we climbed in the last year on what John Hattie calls the "ladder of excellence?" Whatever role in which we are presently cast, we might ask the same question. Whether a seasoned veteran mentor or a wide-eyed newbie, we are each somewhere reaching ever higher.

One of the primary objectives of a new teacher and mentor program at a school ought to be a focus on accelerating this rate of climb for new teachers and mentors alike. If the relationship is truly collaborative, both are enriched through the mutual benefit of experiences and expertise.

The type of growth hoped for in a mentoring relationship can only occur through a process of dialogue. As Paulo Freire describes it, dialogue is dependent on both members of the relationship having an equal voice and working together to construct an improved understanding. He says that "no one can say a true word alone—nor can she say it for another, in a prescriptive act which robs others of their words. Dialogue is the encounter between men, mediated by the world, in order to name the world."

In such a complex profession as education, if we are to advance, we must engage in a constant process of naming and renaming the world. At the core of the work of an educator is something like what Wallace Stevens describes as a "response to the daily necessity of getting the world right." And to really get it right, we will need to share in the expertise of others who are similarly engaged in the same process.

 

 

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If you are looking for something to do next we have an idea for you.  The 2015 UEA Convention & Education Exposition is Thursday and Friday, October 15-16, at the South Towne Expo Center. This convention features professional development for K-12 educators, keynote speakers, a New Educators’ Workshop and hundreds of vendor booths.

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We have very likely heard the quote concerning an ounce of prevention.  However, when it comes to effectively managing the classroom, many of us forget and attempt in a futile gesture to instead focus on cures.  We attempt to stamp out the behaviors instead of finding preventative solutions.  According to Bill Gates "treatment without prevention is simply unsustainable."  Luckily, we know what works to prevent a majority of behavioral mishaps.  Recently, the USOE published the http://www.schools.utah.gov/sars/Behavior/ManualPrint.aspx  to help educators understand and implement best practices concerning student behavioral management.  On the topic of prevention, they state that "All students benefit academically and socially when their classroom and school environments are positive, preventive, and responsive" (LRBI, 27). So, it is not just a way to relieve teacher stress (though it might do that too).  Taking positive actions to control behavior is an essential component of an optimized learning environment.  The first pillar in prevention is establishing rules. It would be difficult to overstate the importance that establishing and maintaining rules has in the classroom.  Unfortunately, not all rules fall in the effective category.  In fact, classroom rules sometimes cause problems they are intended to prevent.  In order to ensure that classroom rules bring about the desired consequence of preventing behavioral problems, a few recommendations should be satisfied (LRBI, 28).

  1. Prioritize expectations by limiting the number to three to five classroom-wide rules.
  2. State expected behaviors positively.
  3. Use developmentally appropriate language in the wording (vocabulary appropriate to student age, functional level, and skill level).
  4. State explicitly what the behavior looks and sounds like.
  5. Make rules observable and measurable (able to be counted or quantified for monitoring).
  6. Post the rules publicly for all to see.

After rules are written, it becomes necessary to set them in motion and keep them in motion throughout the remainder of the school year.  For further help with how to do this, please refer to the http://www.schools.utah.gov/sars/Behavior/ManualPrint.aspx. Additionally, our district offers a course called Effective Teacher Training: How To Get Your Students to Do What You Want them To Do.  Taking the course will help to do just as the name suggests.  More information and registration for the course is found in JPLS.

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