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As we anticipate the future of our students, we need to keep in mind the emotional needs of students.

Kathleen Minke, the executive director of the National Association of School Psychologists, made this observation: 

“School psychologists know that academic efforts cannot proceed without addressing psychological and emotional trauma. Learning will not occur unless the emotional needs of both students and adults are addressed. Indeed, pretending that everything is 'normal' will likely exacerbate underlying traumas and further delay genuine recovery.”

She recommends these ideas:

  1. Recovery plan
  2. Assess, don’t assume
  3. Develop a resource plan
  4. Use Professional Development

Emotional trauma

Building Your Resilience
From:   American Psychological Association

Like building a muscle, increasing your resilience takes time and intentionality.Focusing on four core components — building connections, fostering wellness, finding purpose and embracing healthy thinking — can empower you to withstand and learn from difficult experiences.

The important thing is to remember you’re not alone on the journey. While you may not be able to control all of your circumstances, you can grow by focusing on the aspects of life’s challenges that you can manage with the support of loved ones and trusted professionals.

https://www.apa.org/topics/resilience